Transmission and Mask mandate

Discussion in 'Crossfire' started by Bendman, Jul 22, 2020.

  1. Bendman

    Bendman I.T.S. Redshirt Freshman
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    Value of a mask mandate: Goldman Sachs says One trillion dollars. Chicken feed these days.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/sarahh...y-1-trillion-goldman-sachs-says/#701132f256f1

    AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION While we continue to learn more about the SARS-CoV-2 virus, many uncertainties remain, particularly with respect to modes of transmission. As we previously covered, emerging evidence supports the possibility of airborne/aerosol transmission of the virus, and a number of health experts recently called on the WHO to update its transmission and infection control guidance to place greater emphasis on airborne transmission risk. The WHO did issue updated guidance on SARS-CoV-2 transmission, which noted the possibility of airborne transmission. However, the document continues to emphasize that droplet transmission is believed to be the principal driver of the pandemic.

    A recent study published (preprint) by researchers at several US health and academic institutions provides additional evidence supporting the possibility of airborne transmission. The researchers collected aerosol samples from 6 COVID-19 patient treatment areas to determine the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the airborne environment. The specimens were analyzed to identify the presence of infectious virus in various particle sizes—greater than 4.1 µm, 1-4 µm, and less than 1 µm—via “real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), cell culture, western blot, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).” The study identified viral RNA in all 6 patient rooms and in all 3 particle sizes. Additionally, the researchers were able to culture viable virus from multiple aerosol samples in the “less than 1 µm” category. While this study demonstrates that viable virus can be present in aerosol form, additional research is necessary to determine the role it plays in transmission. In particular, questions remain regarding the infectious dose for SARS-CoV-2, especially with respect to the amount of virus present in aerosols, and how long the virus can remain viable in aerosol form.
     
  2. Bendman

    Bendman I.T.S. Redshirt Freshman
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    From Johns Hopkins news letter. Recovery can be long term and damaging.

    LONG-TERM ILLNESS The US CDC COVID-19 Response Team, in collaboration with researchers from across the US, published analysis on the long-term health effects of COVID-19 in patients who did not require hospitalization. The study, published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, investigated recovering COVID-19 patients’ return to normal health status. Based on interviews with 270 COVID-19 patients who were not admitted to the hospital for treatment, 35% reported that they had not yet returned to their normal level of health at the time of the interview, conducted 14-21 days after their positive SARS-CoV-2 test. The proportion of patients who had not yet fully recovered increased with age, ranging from 26% for patients aged 18-34 years to 47% for patients aged 50 years and older, and with the number of underlying health conditions, ranging from 28% for individuals with zero or one pre-existing health condition to 57% for individuals with 3 or more underlying health conditions. The most common persistent health conditions following SARS-CoV-2 infection were cough (43% of those who reported experiencing the symptom at the time of their test), fatigue (35%), and shortness of breath (29%). Among those whose symptoms resolved, the median time for individual symptoms to resolve was 4-8 days after the test date. Interestingly, among participants that reported returning to their normal health status, 34% still reported experiencing at least 1 of 17 symptoms associated with COVID-19 at the time of their interview.

    Most studies on the long-term health effects of COVID-19 focus on hospitalized or severe cases, but this study provides evidence that even COVID-19 patients who are not ill enough to warrant hospitalization can experience longer-term health effects. Depending on the severity and duration of these chronic conditions, they could potentially impact individuals’ ability to resume normal activities after recovery from the acute stage of the disease.
     

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