This is the Republican Party

Gmoney4WW

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If the mission in Russia to stop this attack on Ukraine, and the revolutionary stirrings in Iran is somewhat successful? Will we see the strong man, dictatorial affinity in the Republican party calm itself down in any significant way. If Putin, Kim Jong Unny type love in the Republican party dissipated that would be a good thing.

I would love the political scene in the world to help knock Trump & his like off their perch. If a few more figures in the world, like Bolsonara lose, that would help to calm this aspect down in world politics. The immigration problem that the masses are already stirred up over(in the US & in the world) won't go away though. That is part of the love affair with the dictatorial aspect.
 

noble cane

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If the mission in Russia to stop this attack on Ukraine, and the revolutionary stirrings in Iran is somewhat successful? Will we see the strong man, dictatorial affinity in the Republican party calm itself down in any significant way. If Putin, Kim Jong Unny type love in the Republican party dissipated that would be a good thing.

I would love the political scene in the world to help knock Trump & his like off their perch. If a few more figures in the world, like Bolsonara lose, that would help to calm this aspect down in world politics. The immigration problem that the masses are already stirred up over(in the US & in the world) won't go away though. That is part of the love affair with the dictatorial aspect.
So you are pulling for the Marxist, Lula, to win in Brazil?
 

Gmoney4WW

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So you are pulling for the Marxist, Lula, to win in Brazil?
No, I am pulling for someone other than Bolsonaro to win. Just like with Trump. It is better to have a Democrat/Marxist over Trump/Bolsonaro.

Who holds that office will change over the next few years, while the damage Bolsonaro is doing will take 15 or 20 years to fix. What Bolsonaro is doing to the rain forest needs to be stopped, for the sake of the world. Present economic needs of Brazil are inconsequential to what destroying the rain forest does to the entire world.

Now you have my permission to put your laughing in tears like, on this post.
 

lawpoke87

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No, I am pulling for someone other than Bolsonaro to win. Just like with Trump. It is better to have a Democrat/Marxist over Trump/Bolsonaro.

Who holds that office will change over the next few years, while the damage Bolsonaro is doing will take 15 or 20 years to fix. What Bolsonaro is doing to the rain forest needs to be stopped, for the sake of the world. Present economic needs of Brazil are inconsequential to what destroying the rain forest does to the entire world.

Now you have my permission to put your laughing in tears like, on this post.
The people of Venezuela might disagree with you.
 
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noble cane

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No, I am pulling for someone other than Bolsonaro to win. Just like with Trump. It is better to have a Democrat/Marxist over Trump/Bolsonaro.

Who holds that office will change over the next few years, while the damage Bolsonaro is doing will take 15 or 20 years to fix. What Bolsonaro is doing to the rain forest needs to be stopped, for the sake of the world. Present economic needs of Brazil are inconsequential to what destroying the rain forest does to the entire world.

Now you have my permission to put your laughing in tears like, on this post.
No need.. I will laugh when Lula continues those policies to keep his populace employed and his party in power.
 

Gmoney4WW

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No need.. I will laugh when Lula continues those policies to keep his populace employed and his party in power.
It's funny how no candidate or President in the entire history of Brazil has had to maul one of the few things converting co2 in large quantities ever. But according to you at the worst time ever, every joe candidate/elect will have to do this to keep their office. Did Brazil suddenly have the worst unemployment in their entire history?

Or is it that Bolsonaro gave them 'permission', and now they will all do it? I'll at least take the chance that his opponent, and former president, hopefully won't do it. Because I KNOW Bolsonaro will. Especially with the permission of his voting electorate. They would have just given him the vote of confidence to use his permission with abandon if he were elected.
 

aTUfan

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More than a single man who's allowed to do anything he wants? With no fear of repercussion for himself or his associates? So you fear legislators more than dictators? Well you better just crown your King now.
King Joe,
the round table of Schumer, Pelosi, Shiff, ...
the king's guard (doj/fbi)
the town cryer -- msn, cnn, npr, nyt, . . .
the guillotine for the opposition
 

aTUfan

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some republican politicians are PROPOSING an abortion ban.

all democrate in congress HAVE installed socialist policies and fanned the flames of inflation with their legislation.
 

watu05

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So much for Republican support for big business? The Chamber of Commerce in hot water?

"Forget, for the moment, about the prospects a Republican House majority would impeach President Biden for TBD reasons. Consider, instead, the very likely prospects a GOP-held Congress would escalate the party’s war with large segments of corporate America.

Amazon. AT&T. Boeing. Delta Air Lines. Facebook. General Motors. Harley Davidson. Lockheed Martin. Macy’s. Merck. Nordstrom. Toyota. Former president Donald Trump never shied from attacking corporations he felt had somehow crossed him, politically, financially, or personally.

Of the many ways Trump amplified or upended traditional Republican norms, breaking down the party’s century-old alliance with big business has had lasting power — and if the GOP retake one or both houses of Congress, the conflict will almost certainly escalate.

But it’s not just Trump. Here are some of the other forces at work:

A global market and a desire to reach younger, more educated consumers has led corporations to pay more attention to — and be more vocal about supporting — issues like fighting the climate crisis and promoting racial equity, putting them at odds with Republicans.
GOP voter support for corporations has gone off a cliff. Between 2019 and 2021, the proportion of Republicans saying corporations have a positive impact on the way things are going in the United States declined 24 percentage points, from 54 percent to 30 percent, according to a Pew Research Center study published last summer.
Many elected Republicans have not forgiven corporate America for vowing to stop financing the campaigns of the eight senators and 139 representatives (a majority of the House GOP caucus) who voted to overturn Biden’s victory hours after the Capitol riot. This, even though many firms quickly reversed course.

One factor there: The suddenly closed corporate wallets didn’t seem to do much damage to GOP fundraising. So it angered Republicans without showing any real power over them. That may be why House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) has signaled to the Chamber of Commerce it needs new leadership to patch up its relations with Republicans.

Likely targets, if Trump’s party retakes one or both chambers of Congress:

Major technology firms, especially social media platforms that restrict disinformation or banned prominent Republicans, including Trump.
Large corporations, including banks, that prioritize sustainable or environmentally friendly investment.
Companies that invest in China, particularly sectors connected to national security.

Democrats pressure corporations too, of course. But one major difference recently has been that they tend to threaten boycotts — that is to say, market pressure — while Republicans have tended to threaten using political power for retaliation.

So here’s high-powered GOP consultant Josh Holmes, a former chief of staff to Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) responding to corporations suspending advertising on Twitter in the aftermath of Elon Musk’s acquisition of the social media site:

Asked to elaborate, Holmes told The Daily 202 (in part, his whole answer is too long to quote entirely): “From a business standpoint, there has never been a price for weighing deeply into territory [corporate CEOs] don’t understand and taking positions antithetical to the interests of their consumers and workers. Those days are numbered.”

(McConnell himself had angry words for corporations after some of the most prominent firms in Georgia criticized the state’s new elections law. “My advice to the corporate CEOs of America is to stay out of politics. Don’t pick sides in these big fights,” he said.)

On the same issue, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) went one step further than McConnell, warning in a Wall Street Journal editorial: “I hope the Democrats take your calls, because we may not.”
 

TU_BLA

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Pubs are the ones attacking corporations huh….and I don’t ever necessarily disagree with him here.


He's not wrong. Oil and gas prices right now are not being driven by supply and demand. If that were the case we would expect less oil and gas on the market and profits of the oil and gas companies to remain steady not double in a year. Gas prices right now are due to nothing more than corporate opportunism.

My wife works closely with the oil and gas industry. Oil companies (and worse, the commodity traders) were able to artificially set the price of a barrel exorbitantly high because they knew the majority of the public had no idea that the Keystone XL Pipeline (spur) was not carrying a drop of oil to US refineries for refinement into auto gasoline to be used in cars in the US. NOT. A. DROP. Most voters also don't understand that oil prices are manipulated by OPEC and despite the fact the US is largely independent of needing foreign supply to meet its needs, the price is really set by Chinese consumption and oil companies in the US will sell their oil overseas if it means fetching a higher price than selling it to refineries domestically. So all of the GOP hacks talking about energy independence knows that this plays with their ignorant base and there is absolutely nothing the US government can do minus capping the price of a barrel for domestic use or capping the price of a gallon of gas...which doesn't play well. They also know that US oil companies are sitting on thousands of oil leases that they haven't touched...all to score political points.
 
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lawpoke87

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He's not wrong. Oil and gas prices right now are not being driven by supply and demand. If that were the case we would expect less oil and gas on the market and profits of the oil and gas companies to remain steady not double in a year. Gas prices right now are due to nothing more than corporate opportunism.

My wife works closely with the oil and gas industry. Oil companies (and worse, the commodity traders) were able to artificially set the price of a barrel exorbitantly high because they knew the majority of the public had no idea that the Keystone XL Pipeline (spur) was not carrying a drop of oil to US refineries for refinement into auto gasoline to be used in cars in the US. NOT. A. DROP. Most voters also don't understand that oil prices are manipulated by OPEC and despite the fact the US is largely independent of needing foreign supply to meet its needs, the price is really set by Chinese consumption and oil companies in the US will sell their oil overseas if it means fetching a higher price than selling it to refineries domestically. So all of the GOP hacks talking about energy independence knows that this plays with their ignorant base and there is absolutely nothing the US government can do minus capping the price of a barrel for domestic use or capping the price of a gallon of gas...which doesn't play well. They also know that US oil companies are sitting on thousands of oil leases that they haven't touched...all to score political points.
Corporate gauging has little to do with global oil prices. That’s a supply versus demand equation. The statement there’s nothing we can do about the price of oil isn’t correct. If we could increase supply the global price would decrease. Assuming the boys at OPEC don’t further decrease their output. There’s a reason why Biden begged and pleaded with OPEC not to decrease supply.
 

astonmartin708

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Pubs are the ones attacking corporations huh….and I don’t ever necessarily disagree with him here.


I mean, if the profit numbers show that there is corporate gouging going on (not just referring to oil companies) then I would tend to believe the numbers.
 

lawpoke87

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I mean, if the profit numbers show that there is corporate gouging going on (not just referring to oil companies) then I would tend to believe the numbers.
Like I said….I don’t disagree with him. I would like to look into their P&L in order to see where those profits are derived but in its face it doesn’t look good.
 

aTUfan

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So much for Republican support for big business? The Chamber of Commerce in hot water?

"Forget, for the moment, about the prospects a Republican House majority would impeach President Biden for TBD reasons. Consider, instead, the very likely prospects a GOP-held Congress would escalate the party’s war with large segments of corporate America.

Amazon. AT&T. Boeing. Delta Air Lines. Facebook. General Motors. Harley Davidson. Lockheed Martin. Macy’s. Merck. Nordstrom. Toyota. Former president Donald Trump never shied from attacking corporations he felt had somehow crossed him, politically, financially, or personally.

Of the many ways Trump amplified or upended traditional Republican norms, breaking down the party’s century-old alliance with big business has had lasting power — and if the GOP retake one or both houses of Congress, the conflict will almost certainly escalate.

But it’s not just Trump. Here are some of the other forces at work:

A global market and a desire to reach younger, more educated consumers has led corporations to pay more attention to — and be more vocal about supporting — issues like fighting the climate crisis and promoting racial equity, putting them at odds with Republicans.
GOP voter support for corporations has gone off a cliff. Between 2019 and 2021, the proportion of Republicans saying corporations have a positive impact on the way things are going in the United States declined 24 percentage points, from 54 percent to 30 percent, according to a Pew Research Center study published last summer.
Many elected Republicans have not forgiven corporate America for vowing to stop financing the campaigns of the eight senators and 139 representatives (a majority of the House GOP caucus) who voted to overturn Biden’s victory hours after the Capitol riot. This, even though many firms quickly reversed course.

One factor there: The suddenly closed corporate wallets didn’t seem to do much damage to GOP fundraising. So it angered Republicans without showing any real power over them. That may be why House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) has signaled to the Chamber of Commerce it needs new leadership to patch up its relations with Republicans.

Likely targets, if Trump’s party retakes one or both chambers of Congress:

Major technology firms, especially social media platforms that restrict disinformation or banned prominent Republicans, including Trump.
Large corporations, including banks, that prioritize sustainable or environmentally friendly investment.
Companies that invest in China, particularly sectors connected to national security.

Democrats pressure corporations too, of course. But one major difference recently has been that they tend to threaten boycotts — that is to say, market pressure — while Republicans have tended to threaten using political power for retaliation.

So here’s high-powered GOP consultant Josh Holmes, a former chief of staff to Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) responding to corporations suspending advertising on Twitter in the aftermath of Elon Musk’s acquisition of the social media site:

Asked to elaborate, Holmes told The Daily 202 (in part, his whole answer is too long to quote entirely): “From a business standpoint, there has never been a price for weighing deeply into territory [corporate CEOs] don’t understand and taking positions antithetical to the interests of their consumers and workers. Those days are numbered.”

(McConnell himself had angry words for corporations after some of the most prominent firms in Georgia criticized the state’s new elections law. “My advice to the corporate CEOs of America is to stay out of politics. Don’t pick sides in these big fights,” he said.)

On the same issue, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) went one step further than McConnell, warning in a Wall Street Journal editorial: “I hope the Democrats take your calls, because we may not.”
 

watu05

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Arizona's Cochise county may elect another Dem to the house? Evidently if the county continues to refuse to certify it's election results, the whole county's votes may be thrown out. It's a very conservative county, so throwing out its votes would change the election results in a direction the county would hate. Nice irony, but I suspect they will wake up.
 

aTUfan

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Arizona's Cochise county may elect another Dem to the house? Evidently if the county continues to refuse to certify it's election results, the whole county's votes may be thrown out. It's a very conservative county, so throwing out its votes would change the election results in a direction the county would hate. Nice irony, but I suspect they will wake up.
Arizona should have a total revote. There were too many mistakes, problems, and questionable occurances. also the person in charge of the election was a candidate for govenor; conflict of interest.
 

eastcane

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Oh bull, nonsense. Nothing but sore losers, Kari Lake is a 2020 election denier, and clearly, her spots haven't changed with her 2022 loss. Maybe not run McCain supporters out of your rallies to please the orange GOP standard bearer Kari.
 
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aTUfan

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Oh bull, nonsense. Nothing but sore losers, Kari Lake is a 2020 election denier, and clearly, her spots haven't changed with her 2022 loss. Maybe not run McCain supporters out of your rallies to please the orange GOP standard bearer Kari.
no documented machine failures, lack of ballots, misprinted ballots, unsigned mail-in ballots, lack of chain of custity of ballots, it took over a week to count 1.5 milliion while Fla counted 7.5 million in 5 hours, the person overseeing the election was a candidate, lots of personal accounts of problems, long lines caused some potentional voters to not vote, . .
 

eastcane

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no documented machine failures, lack of ballots, misprinted ballots, unsigned mail-in ballots, lack of chain of custity of ballots, it took over a week to count 1.5 milliion while Fla counted 7.5 million in 5 hours, the person overseeing the election was a candidate, lots of personal accounts of problems, long lines caused some potentional voters to not vote, . .
 

eastcane

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Each state does elections differently, have different rules, with the common goals of fairness and accountability. Elections aren't on a cable news time schedule. Please direct me to any wide spread fraud that would have been material enough to change the final results in both the House and Senate races in 2022.
 
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lawpoke87

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I haven’t seen anything to suggest race outcomes were significantly affected but let’s not pretend Arizona didn’t experience major issues on Election Day with its voting machines. They have to do better

 

Gmoney4WW

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no documented machine failures, lack of ballots, misprinted ballots, unsigned mail-in ballots, lack of chain of custity of ballots, it took over a week to count 1.5 milliion while Fla counted 7.5 million in 5 hours, the person overseeing the election was a candidate, lots of personal accounts of problems, long lines caused some potentional voters to not vote, . .
Machine failures happen at every election. There are processes in place to keep the voting processes working even with a machine failure.

Unsigned mail in ballots happen at every election, and their is a process to validate or invalidate them.

There was no lack of broken chain of custity custody in Arizona. Just another of the myths created by the conservative media. The sealed envelope, mail in ballots were transported by bipartisan election workers to a business that has worked with Arizona for many years. They print ballots for elections, and scan the outside of sealed envelopes so they can analyze signatures in order to match them with signatures on record. The envelopes were never unsealed until they were at the election board.

Every state is different, and has their own laws which affects the speed of counting. And mail in ballots with the timing and counts of when they come in, also varies from state to state. The # of last minute mail in ballots greatly affects the speed of counting.

There are perfectly valid explanations and solutions for all the problems that you mentioned, and have been encountered in many and sometimes all elections before.

You keep posting this crap by reflex, probably without having researched it at all.
 

Gmoney4WW

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I haven’t seen anything to suggest race outcomes were significantly affected but let’s not pretend Arizona didn’t experience major issues on Election Day with its voting machines. They have to do better

Yeah, there was more problems than normal with the machines. It is mail in ballot usage increasing by both parties, that is at the root of many of these problems. They had ballot changes on many of their ballots, because of the process,(added questions in certain counties) but also printing problems.

They would have been able to still meet their needs properly, but had more mail in ballots that took up many of their ballots printed. So they had to do last minute printing for in precinct voting. On some of ballots, the printing came out too light for the machines to read them as presently calibrated. That was where many of the machines had problems.

Essentially the different states need to account for more need for mail in ballots, and bring that process more up to speed. Sometimes that takes changes in law, and state congressional action. Speed and congressional action are oxymoronic to each other.
 

astonmartin708

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LOL. The WaPo covering dress bills from a state legislature. If there were only national stories worthy of coverage.

WATU may want to review the Senate dress code which the Dem majority enforce :).
Well, the House Republican females would not meet the Missouri legislature’s dress code. The legislature was legislating on an issue that wasn’t really an issue just to enforce their will on members that disagree with them.
 

lawpoke87

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Well, the House Republican females would not meet the Missouri legislature’s dress code. The legislature was legislating on an issue that wasn’t really an issue just to enforce their will on members that disagree with them.
1). Really don’t care what the Missouri House does.
2). Sounds a lot like what the Dems enforce in the Senate
 

Gmoney4WW

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There's also the whole, sexism thing lol.
The men don't bare their shoulders in congress(in Missouri or DC) either. This is a minor issue being made into a major issue in Missouri(by both sides) and you are both carrying their water.
 
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lawpoke87

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The men don't bear their shoulders in congress(in Missouri or DC) either. This is a minor issue being made into a major issue in Missouri(by both sides) and you are both carrying their water.
I don’t really care either way. WATU and WaPo were the one who thought it was newsworthy. I simply pointed out the Missouri bill resembles the current dress code in the Senate. My company has a dress code but it is far more lax than tbe ones being mentioned
 
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astonmartin708

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The men don't bare their shoulders in congress(in Missouri or DC) either. This is a minor issue being made into a major issue in Missouri(by both sides) and you are both carrying their water.
Showing your shoulders. LMAO. Any elected body should not need a dress code. If you dress in poor class it should be reflected in your ability to be elected.

Let’s just make all of the female representatives wear Burkas makes about as much sense.
 

lawpoke87

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Showing your shoulders. LMAO. Any elected body should not need a dress code. If you dress in poor class it should be reflected in your ability to be elected.

Let’s just make all of the female representatives wear Burkas makes about as much sense.
I don’t disagree. I’m actually a bit surprised the Senate still enforces its rather strict dress code. Especially with the Dems in charge.