Making Covid permanent?

TULSARISING

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Jun 21, 2017
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We have to many stupid people in Oklahoma that believe other what other stupid people put in an article. Most of the people getting really sick and dying are not vaccinated. Nobody ever said the covid vaccine would prevent it all together , but that it would make the diseases more like a cold than a deadly outcome.
 
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lawpoke87

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Does anyone on this board believe vaccines don’t work? Just curious. We have a long history of vaccines working to reduce and often eliminate diseases. As I said in another thread….we can and should learn from history and not repeat our mistakes. Vaccines work….history.
 

URedskin54

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Vaccines work, yes, and seasonality and new variants are going to mean case increases everywhere at some point whether people are vaccinated or not. Not something that was ever going away. Between prior infection and the vaccines there probably isn't a single state with less than 70% of people with some level of immunity. Everyone has access to the vaccines, everyone has been informed of the risk of not taking it. Some like Shon have chosen to eat crayons. So be it. Time to move on
 
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watu05

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Not being vaccinated is not a victimless act in that it expands the the opportunities for variants and leads to infections of others who will be affected.
While it is a reasonable guess that in the US 70% of the population is either vaccinated or already infected, it's not evenly distributed as surges in Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi show.
Just saying that's good enough, however, is not an approach the world has taken with measles, polio, or other diseases where vaccinations have virtually eliminated them worldwide. The flu currently mutates more quickly and is less lethal than Covid, so living with it is our only current option. Covid mutates more slowly, is more leathal and has longer term effects on many of those who recover, so just saying "good enough" doesn't have to be our only option.
 

URedskin54

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Not being vaccinated is not a victimless act in that it expands the the opportunities for variants and leads to infections of others who will be affected.
While it is a reasonable guess that in the US 70% of the population is either vaccinated or already infected, it's not evenly distributed as surges in Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi show.
Just saying that's good enough, however, is not an approach the world has taken with measles, polio, or other diseases where vaccinations have virtually eliminated them worldwide. The flu currently mutates more quickly and is less lethal than Covid, so living with it is our only current option. Covid mutates more slowly, is more leathal and has longer term effects on many of those who recover, so just saying "good enough" doesn't have to be our only option.

And what does the California surge show? LA county is already putting new restrictions back in. How about the UK surge? I'm as pro-vaccine as anyone, but it's not getting rid of covid or variants no matter the vaccination rates. This is especially true when you consider this as a global phenomenon. Variants are going to make their way here from other countries just like delta. We can send them vaccines but it will still happen. It'll become endemic eventually and we'll have it around forever and, dumb or not, it won't be the vax truthers' fault. Time to move on from the virus engineered by the chi-coms.
 
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lawpoke87

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Sadly, our biggest risk of mutations in the future will come from outside our borders where billions won’t be vaccinated. There’s very little we can do about this risk. Pretty good bet that we will eventually see a mutation travel here from outside our country which the vaccine or immunity from having already contracted the virus will not be effective. Just a numbers game. The odds of a mutation coming from an unprotected population of say 60M is far less than from a population of 4 billion. We can do what we can do but in the end the US can only reduce the risk of a mutation by a very small amount.
 

watu05

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True, but polio, measles, etc have been virtually eliminated worldwide through vaccinations. Why not Covid? All US kids get MMR vaxes when small, and residential colleges now frequently require meningitus shots to appear on campus, etc.
The current surges show we in US haven’t achieved herd immunity yet, at least in the south.
 
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TUMe

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I don't know what the answer is, but the question is whether there will ever be total immunity? You list a number of diseases that have been eleminated. But there are a number of subspecies of Homo that no longer exist. Man hasn't always won.

Having said that, I still believe that we all should do everything we can to defeat Covid. If they come out with a third shot, I will take it. But it is not absolutely given that we will win.
 

watu05

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Well, I guess we have to hope that the Delta variant quickly takes care of herd immunity among the unvaccinated. Unfortunately the Delta virus is much more harmful to children than previous variants and for everyone is more likely to leave long term effects after 'recovery'.

Again, it's a mystery why the Republicans have made anti-vaxing a key issue, especially in the SE where the virus is surging.

"While 86% of Democrats have been vaccinated, only 45% of Republicans have gotten a shot. Nearly all of the currently unvaccinated Republicans flat-out refuse to do it ever. So COVID-19 is quickly becoming a regional disease, with hotspots concentrated in deeply Republican areas of the country. And while the delta variant is more contagious, the main reason it's spreading is because of low vaccination rates, as 99.7% of new cases have been among the unvaccinated."
 
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URedskin54

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There's a pretty substantial rise in cases in some pretty heavily vaccinated counties, so i'm not sure the 99.7% number is holding up. It's probably not the relevant stat anyway. Unless it's all young people getting infected, the difference we'll likely see in SW missouri compared to LA or Miami will be in hospitalizations and deaths
 
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astonmartin708

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I’m just sick of the misinformation that’s available to people and is influencing their decisions. I just had a coworker tell me the wonders of ivermectin which was a parasite drug that was being pushed by an Egyptian study which has since been retracted because of bogus data and research practices. The fellow telling me about it said he would rather get the virus (even the more dangerous strain) than get the vaccine because the ivermectin would save him. He also told me all about the government website for adverse reactions which lists deaths that occurred after vaccine administration. The only problem is that they record all deaths after vaccine administration even if they’re not definitively related to the vaccine.

Even if there had been a significant number of adverse illnesses after the vaccine, I believe it’s still our duty to get the shot. No different than being drafted to fight for the country in a time when it’s of extreme necessity.
 

URedskin54

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I’m just sick of the misinformation that’s available to people and is influencing their decisions. I just had a coworker tell me the wonders of ivermectin which was a parasite drug that was being pushed by an Egyptian study which has since been retracted because of bogus data and research practices. The fellow telling me about it said he would rather get the virus (even the more dangerous strain) than get the vaccine because the ivermectin would save him. He also told me all about the government website for adverse reactions which lists deaths that occurred after vaccine administration. The only problem is that they record all deaths after vaccine administration even if they’re not definitively related to the vaccine.

Even if there had been a significant number of adverse illnesses after the vaccine, I believe it’s still our duty to get the shot. No different than being drafted to fight for the country in a time when it’s of extreme necessity.

Didn't realize you worked with Shon
 
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astonmartin708

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Didn't realize you worked with Shon
Dude is an electrical engineer and he doesn’t know how to discern fact from fiction.

I’ve also been told in the past few days that your employer can’t ask you about your Vaccination status because of HIPPA rules, which just makes no sense because employers aren’t entities regulated by HIPPA (unless you work for certain types of healthcare related entities)
 

TULSARISING

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Jun 21, 2017
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I’m just sick of the misinformation that’s available to people and is influencing their decisions. I just had a coworker tell me the wonders of ivermectin which was a parasite drug that was being pushed by an Egyptian study which has since been retracted because of bogus data and research practices. The fellow telling me about it said he would rather get the virus (even the more dangerous strain) than get the vaccine because the ivermectin would save him. He also told me all about the government website for adverse reactions which lists deaths that occurred after vaccine administration. The only problem is that they record all deaths after vaccine administration even if they’re not definitively related to the vaccine.

Even if there had been a significant number of adverse illnesses after the vaccine, I believe it’s still our duty to get the shot. No different than being drafted to fight for the country in a time when it’s of extreme necessity.
Just to let you know, I use ivermectin on my livestock for worms ... not a virus 😂
 

TUMe

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Ivermectin is a real medicne for dogs and other animals. The question is "why would you prefer to use it to a vaccine which has status from the government for fighting Covid?"

I plan to use Ivermectin on my pecan tree later in the year. I have heard it will make your nuts fall off.
 
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watu05

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It appears that vaccination lowers one risk of hospitalization but not of infecting others with the Delta Variant. Even if one isn't hospitalized by the Delta Covid, there mental and long haul effects remain a risk and are independent of symptoms. We already know about 12 vaccinated people in our neighborhood who have vaccinated family members who have tested positive.

So are we starting all over again? Moderna and Pfizer are working on Delta Variant boosters which won't be available for some time.

 

watu05

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What it’s turned out to look like is R’s are the party of “we don’t give a F*ck if you die or not”
Politics aside, these are sad stories. I can understand people being cautious about a new vaccine, but the Delta variant arrived after the safety of the vaccines had been established. Public health should be a medical-scientific debate, not a political one.

 

TUMe

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Politics aside, these are sad stories. I can understand people being cautious about a new vaccine, but the Delta variant arrived after the safety of the vaccines had been established. Public health should be a medical-scientific debate, not a political one.
This is a serious and fast changing situation. I agree it is time to put politics aside.
 

lawpoke87

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Vaccinated people now getting the Delta is obviously not great news. A coronavirus variant which can escape the current vaccines is more likely to evolve in a vaccinated host. We aren’t close to being done with this virus and expect more variants which are vaccine resistant. The good news is the virus now appears much less lethal than it was when it first arrived. Not sure how much of that is the virus itself versus improved treatments.
 

watu05

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The POT is leading the effort to undermine faith in science, vaccinations and other public health measures. The hypocrisy of Trump's whining about the vaccines not being available before the election and complaining about not getting credit for Warp Speed sharply contrasts with the POT's efforts to undermine their use. Party over country.
 
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