Bourbon 🥃

Chris Harmon

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Ok, so where do you get these from?
Got these from a buddy in Azle, TX. They get so much more good whiskey in Texas. I didn't realize that Oklahoma gets zero Willett products. I might have my buddy send me some Johnny Drum and/or Kentucky Vintage.

But you can order stuff online at Blackwells Wine & Spirits. @Gmoney4WW told me about that site...I believe he orders from there.
 

Henry Kendall

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OK....here is the long-winded version. It's much easier to teach this than type it. Here's a riff on old-fashioned that I came up with that has gotten very good reviews from my friends. And pardon all the detail, but details matter in drinks like this.

Inside Job cocktail (this makes one drink, but I double it when I make it:cool:)

2 oz your favorite bourbon (nothing too wheated and mellow...use a stronger flavor if you have it)
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino Cherry Liqueur
.25 oz turbinado simple syrup*
2 dashes Peychaud's bitters

Mix all of the ingredients in a glass with ice. Stir it around to chill the drink. I prefer to then strain it into another glass without ice, as I don't like the dilution. But you can mix it and serve it over ice if you would like.

*To make simple syrup, boil a cup of water and dissolve in one cup of turbinado sugar (look for In The Raw sugar...it's available everywhere). Just make the water and sugar in a 1:1 ratio, and it will keep in the fridge 2-3 weeks. Use this simple syrup with any bourbon drink like an old-fashioned, instead of white sugar simple syrup.

Also, measure the ingredients....don't eyeball them. A little goes a long way.

The Luxardo Liqueur is delicious, and you can use it in lots of stuff.....Hemingway daiquiris come to mind. I have been known to put it on fresh fruit.

Peychaud's bitters are very different than, say, Angostura bitters. These have spicy overtones, like cinnamon and clove flavors.

Hope that all makes sense. I will do more later, if you would like.
 

HuffyCane

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OK....here is the long-winded version. It's much easier to teach this than type it. Here's a riff on old-fashioned that I came up with that has gotten very good reviews from my friends. And pardon all the detail, but details matter in drinks like this.

Inside Job cocktail (this makes one drink, but I double it when I make it:cool:)

2 oz your favorite bourbon (nothing too wheated and mellow...use a stronger flavor if you have it)
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino Cherry Liqueur
.25 oz turbinado simple syrup*
2 dashes Peychaud's bitters

Mix all of the ingredients in a glass with ice. Stir it around to chill the drink. I prefer to then strain it into another glass without ice, as I don't like the dilution. But you can mix it and serve it over ice if you would like.

*To make simple syrup, boil a cup of water and dissolve in one cup of turbinado sugar (look for In The Raw sugar...it's available everywhere). Just make the water and sugar in a 1:1 ratio, and it will keep in the fridge 2-3 weeks. Use this simple syrup with any bourbon drink like an old-fashioned, instead of white sugar simple syrup.

Also, measure the ingredients....don't eyeball them. A little goes a long way.

The Luxardo Liqueur is delicious, and you can use it in lots of stuff.....Hemingway daiquiris come to mind. I have been known to put it on fresh fruit.

Peychaud's bitters are very different than, say, Angostura bitters. These have spicy overtones, like cinnamon and clove flavors.

Hope that all makes sense. I will do more later, if you would like.
Gonna try this tomorrow night ...
 

Henry Kendall

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Here’s an easier recipe. Stuff you would likely have around. My preference of an old-fashioned.

Maple Old-Fashioned

2 oz bourbon
.25 oz Grade A maple syrup (real maple syrup)
2 dashes orange bitters
Small orange wedge

Combine the bourbon, maple syrup and orange bitters in a glass with ice and stir to chill. Squeeze the small orange wedge into the glass and drop it in.
 
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HuffyCane

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Here’s an easier recipe. Stuff you would likely have around. My preference of an old-fashioned.

Maple Old-Fashioned

2 oz bourbon
.25 oz Grade A maple syrup (real maple syrup)
2 dashes orange bitters
Small orange wedge

Combine the bourbon, maple syrup and orange bitters in a glass with ice and stir to chill. Squeeze the small orange wedge into the glass and drop it in.
Back in my bartending days, you garnished with a strip of bacon as a stirrer and called that Kentucky Breakfast. And it’s truly astounding as a brunch drink as you mix the flavors with a plate of eggs, bacon, OJ, pancakes, etc.
 
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Chris Harmon

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My local shop got in a fantastic barrel pick. It's delicious.

123903402_10158958909049400_4416721269690153290_o.jpg
 
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Chris Harmon

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I’ve heard this is delish. Yay for the bourbon thread!!
It's fantastic. I've only had this single barrel iteration of it, but if the regular bottle of Double Oaked is close to this good, it will have a permanent spot on my bar.

By the way, I drank a sample of Weller C.Y.P.B. last night that I got as part of a bottle trade. It was impressive if you could get it at MSRP, but you can't find them, and it's $500 a bottle on secondary. I'd take the Double Oaked over it any day of the week.
 
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HuffyCane

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Guns and Liquor are doing much better than Wall Street.

And well they should be ...
 

Gmoney4WW

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It's fantastic. I've only had this single barrel iteration of it, but if the regular bottle of Double Oaked is close to this good, it will have a permanent spot on my bar.

By the way, I drank a sample of Weller C.Y.P.B. last night that I got as part of a bottle trade. It was impressive if you could get it at MSRP, but you can't find them, and it's $500 a bottle on secondary. I'd take the Double Oaked over it any day of the week.
How much was that double oaked bottle?
 

HuffyCane

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Spent the holiday back in KY with family.

Ended up dropping everything to act on a tip and try and get a bottle of Woodford 5 Wood, but by the time we got into town, it was all gone.

That’s a ninety minute drive one way. Which irked me. I didn’t want to go home empty handed, so I splurged and bought a bottle of Cream of Kentucky.

My idiot cousin has a side table in his dining room that functions as a bar. So while we were at the store, we stocked up on standard speed rail type liquor for the family and mixers. Ketel, Bacardi, Malibu, etc. I put it on the table and didn’t think twice about it.

My cousin, did I mention he’s an idiot, and his hayseed brother in law got into the Cream while I was down the road saying hello to some elderly neighbors.

My cousin, he’s an idiot by the way, has an international farming equipment business and makes millions. He’s about as sophisticated and self aware as “Darryl and my other brother Darryl” on the Newhart Show. A bottle of Cream to him is about as expensive as a bottle of Coke to you and me.

Effhead, you know, the idiot, thinks the Cream is basically rail liquor. He had never heard of it, so he thought it was bottom shelf.

My cousin, the idiot, stop me if you’ve heard me say that before, and his goober best friend brother in law and two of their local redneck buddies, drank all but maybe 4 ounces of my Cream and mixed it with Coke, Dr. Pepper, Ale 8-1, etc.

I tried to play it down, and carefully pour a little into a glass for each of them to explain. Anger, disappointment, laughter, it was all there at once.

They sip on it a little, and these guys do know the more famous small batch bourbons, and then they start talking about how it’s just like the green apple shine they used to make just after college.

Hillbillies. Ugh!
 

Chris Harmon

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Spent the holiday back in KY with family.

Ended up dropping everything to act on a tip and try and get a bottle of Woodford 5 Wood, but by the time we got into town, it was all gone.

That’s a ninety minute drive one way. Which irked me. I didn’t want to go home empty handed, so I splurged and bought a bottle of Cream of Kentucky.

My idiot cousin has a side table in his dining room that functions as a bar. So while we were at the store, we stocked up on standard speed rail type liquor for the family and mixers. Ketel, Bacardi, Malibu, etc. I put it on the table and didn’t think twice about it.

My cousin, did I mention he’s an idiot, and his hayseed brother in law got into the Cream while I was down the road saying hello to some elderly neighbors.

My cousin, he’s an idiot by the way, has an international farming equipment business and makes millions. He’s about as sophisticated and self aware as “Darryl and my other brother Darryl” on the Newhart Show. A bottle of Cream to him is about as expensive as a bottle of Coke to you and me.

Effhead, you know, the idiot, thinks the Cream is basically rail liquor. He had never heard of it, so he thought it was bottom shelf.

My cousin, the idiot, stop me if you’ve heard me say that before, and his goober best friend brother in law and two of their local redneck buddies, drank all but maybe 4 ounces of my Cream and mixed it with Coke, Dr. Pepper, Ale 8-1, etc.

I tried to play it down, and carefully pour a little into a glass for each of them to explain. Anger, disappointment, laughter, it was all there at once.

They sip on it a little, and these guys do know the more famous small batch bourbons, and then they start talking about how it’s just like the green apple shine they used to make just after college.

Hillbillies. Ugh!
OMG. That's a great story though!
 

HuffyCane

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For $30 to $40...it's excellent.
Bourbon is starting to look/act like fashion. Growing up, I wore Polo shirts during the week, first with Levi’s and then with Guess? jeans. Brooks Brothers to church. I drank Maker’s and Blanton’s throughout, despite the wide availability of Beam and the ever present Jack Daniel’s at the bar, in rock n roll, and T-shirt’s.

Plenty of clothing brands and liquors have come along and some have gone. I still wear Polo and BB. I still drink Makers and Blanton’s. I don’t wear Guess or Levi’s. And I never really think that much about other brands. I buy a bottle of something new because I’m curious.

Stuff that was “new” when I was growing up I just never got into. With Eagle Rare, I tried it for the first time in the basement of Twin Towers. We brought back a bottle from a KY visit in 1987 as an after thought because it had a higher proof than Maker’s as I recall. I remember not liking it at all. It’s never crossed my mind since, though I’m sure I would enjoy it more now.
 
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Chris Harmon

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Bourbon is starting to look/act like fashion. Growing up, I wore Polo shirts during the week, first with Levi’s and then with Guess? jeans. Brooks Brothers to church. I drank Maker’s and Blanton’s throughout, despite the availability of Beam. Plenty of clothing brands and liquors have come along and some have gone. I still wear Polo and BB. I still drink Makers and Blanton’s. I don’t wear Guess or Levi’s. And I never really think that much about other brands. I buy a bottle of something knew because I’m curious when it’s small batch. Stuff that was “new” when I was growing up I just never got into. With Eagle Rare, I tried it for the first time in the basement of Twin Towers. We brought back a bottle from a KY visit in 1987 as an after thought because it had a higher proof than Maker’s. I remember not liking it at all. It’s never crossed my mind since, though I’m sure I would enjoy it more now.
Eagle Rare used to be a single barrel, but now it's batched. Like any single barrel, some bottles are better than others. I like Maker's, especially the Cask Strength, and I'm partial to wheated bourbons. However, I've found I really like bourbons from both mash bill #1 and #2 at Buffalo Trace. Of course their wheated mash bill makes up Weller and Pappy.

Mash bill #1 includes regular Buffalo Trace, Eagle Rare, EH Taylor, George T. Stagg and Stagg Jr.

Mash bill #2 includes Blanton's, Hancock Reserve, Elmer T. Lee, Rock Hill Farms and Ancient Age.

Then you've got the John J. Bowman that comes from both mash bills and is shipped to Virginia, re-distilled and aged there.

It's crazy how much stuff comes out of Buffalo Trace, and how over-hyped some of it has become. And almost all of it has become allocated in Oklahoma.

I used to drink the same stuff all the time, and there's certainly nothing wrong with that. A couple months ago, I decided to start trying different stuff. I've found a couple things I don't like at all, like most Rye whiskey and Redwood Empire Pipe Dream. But I've found some stuff I absolutely love too, like Woodford Double Oaked, Wyoming Whiskey Small Batch, John J. Bowman Single Barrel and Early Times Bottled in Bond.
 
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Gmoney4WW

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Eagle Rare used to be a single barrel, but now it's batched. Like any single barrel, some bottles are better than others. I like Maker's, especially the Cask Strength, and I'm partial to wheated bourbons. However, I've found I really like bourbons from both mash bill #1 and #2 at Buffalo Trace. Of course their wheated mash bill makes up Weller and Pappy.

Mash bill #1 includes regular Buffalo Trace, Eagle Rare, EH Taylor, George T. Stagg and Stagg Jr.

Mash bill #2 includes Blanton's, Hancock Reserve, Elmer T. Lee, Rock Hill Farms and Ancient Age.

Then you've got the John J. Bowman that comes from both mash bills and is shipped to Virginia, re-distilled and aged there.

It's crazy how much stuff comes out of Buffalo Trace, and how over-hyped some of it has become. And almost all of it has become allocated in Oklahoma.

I used to drink the same stuff all the time, and there's certainly nothing wrong with that. A couple months ago, I decided to start trying different stuff. I've found a couple things I don't like at all, like most Rye whiskey and Redwood Empire Pipe Dream. But I've found some stuff I absolutely love too, like Woodford Double Oaked, Wyoming Whiskey Small Batch, John J. Bowman Single Barrel and Early Times Bottled in Bond.
Just a side note: Seeing as how I drink 2/3rds of my Bourbon mixed, I found that Early Times Bottled in Bond went really well with coffee, since the weather cooled off.
 

nevadanatural

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I haven’t read the entire thread but my experience with bourbon is that most have been too harsh to drink without a mixer. The one exception I’ve found is Maker’s Mark which is very smooth and enjoyable. My introduction to whiskey was in college where my buddies would drink an inch or two of their coke and add Weller’s or Southern Comfort. SC and coke, at least to me, tastes like Vicks Formula 44 cough medicine so not a favorite.
 
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HuffyCane

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I haven’t read the entire thread but my experience with bourbon is that most have been too harsh to drink without a mixer. The one exception I’ve found is Maker’s Mark which is very smooth and enjoyable. My introduction to whiskey was in college where my buddies would drink an inch or two of their coke and add Weller’s or Southern Comfort. SC and coke, at least to me, tastes like Vicks Formula 44 cough medicine so not a favorite.
Most people who find whiskey too harsh to drink neat or sip on the rocks are having a reaction to the presence of rye in the recipe. In many people, they have a small slight, perhaps severe, food allergy. If you had a gag reflex the first couple of drinks of Jack Daniel’s in high school, chances are good you are allergic to rye. With or without the allergy, the rye is almost surely the culprit when people reject a bourbon. It’s a cheap filler best fed to horses. You are definitely in this category because Makers was the first major bourbon to omit the rye. Purportedly because Mrs Samuels, who handled the marketing (she came up with the wax idea), made bread from each of the first couple of test batches. Everyone agreed that the mash still used today made the best tasting bread they went with that. It was the only test mash without the rye.

Note that Chris says he doesn’t like the ryes either. Chris or others can give you a list of wheat bourbons. Pappy being the most famous. Weller another. Most have the ingredients on the label. If you see rye, put it back. Try Buffalo Trace first. It does have some rye, but very little.

Which brings me to my second point on harshness. How and where it is aged makes all the difference in the world. The higher the temperature in the summer, the more apt it is to be harsh. The colder it gets the less flavor you get. The aging barrel is a living organism that expands and contracts under weather conditions and it’s the molecular exchange between the wood and liquor that gives bourbon its final taste and colo

So Maker’s uses Wood store houses that have been constructed abd tested over almost 100 years. The guys know how heat enters and lingers in the barn during the summer. They rotate the bourbon up and down the barn several times each summer to give the top barrels a rest and the bottom a kickstart.

The cheap stuff and modern commercial bourbons do not have access to the old barns and ship their stuff out of state for aging. The limestone aquifer in Franklin County and the exact right humidity in summer is what makes KY bourbon exceptional over other areas. You can’t truck it over the United States and age it in an aluminum warehouse, not rotate it, and expect the same results. The one exception might be the original red house where Blanton’s is aged. It is metal. But it is carefully monitored and each barrel is rotated by hand several times.

So you probably want to stick with single barrel and small batches. They have the most closely monitored aging.

And once you study who ages what and where and how, you’ll get a feel for the best tasting regardless of price. Evan Williams Bottled in Bond, when it was not being mass produced, was a good example. It tasted every bit as good as bourbons with shelf prices over $100.00 and I don’t think I’ve ever paid more than $15.00 for it. Again, because EW aged it in place in one of their oldest aging houses.
 
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Chris Harmon

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I haven’t read the entire thread but my experience with bourbon is that most have been too harsh to drink without a mixer. The one exception I’ve found is Maker’s Mark which is very smooth and enjoyable.
Note that Chris says he doesn’t like the ryes either. Chris or others can give you a list of wheat bourbons. Pappy being the most famous. Weller another. Most have the ingredients on the label. If you see rye, put it back. Try Buffalo Trace first. It does have some rye, but very little.
Maker's and Weller are probably the best known and widely available wheaters. Pappy, as Huffy said, is the most famous. The Pappy and Weller line both come out of the Buffalo Trace distillery now.

Other wheated bourbons include Larceny (from Heaven Hill), Rebel Yell (from Luxco), Wyoming Whiskey (out of Wyoming) and Garrison Brothers (out of Texas). Larceny is a throwback to Old Fitzgerald that was purchased by Heaven Hill...it's really good.

As Huffy said, rye whiskey and high-rye bourbon is spicier or harsher on most people's palette. I'm not a fan of rye whiskey, which is over 50 percent rye in the mash bill. High-rye bourbon is hit and miss with me.

Bourbon has to be at least 51 percent corn in the mash bill. The second ingredient is usually rye or wheat, and then typically a small percentage of malted barley. Wheated bourbons are those with wheat in the mash bill rather than rye. Rye often adds spicy, peppery notes...and sometimes earthy notes as well.

Harshness can also come from proof as well. Many people just getting into bourbon should try things in the 80 to 100 proof range. Old Forester 86 proof is a great one...72% corn, 18% rye and 10% malted barley. Notice the low percentage of rye. Of course Buffalo Trace is another, low rye and 90 proof. Then there's wheated stuff like Maker's and Weller.

Once you get used to the proof, you can start drinking 100 proof and move up to some of the 120 and 130+ proof stuff, usually called Cask Strength or Barrel Strength...meaning it is straight out of the barrel and not proofed down (or cut) with water. The only thing that can be added to bourbon out of the barrel is water...otherwise, it's no longer bourbon.

Barrel Strength whiskey has much more depth of flavor. It's much more complex and really coats your tongue. Weller Antique at 107 proof is much better than regular Weller Special Reserve. In my opinion, Maker's Mark Cask Strength at around 110 proof is an even better version of regular Maker's. So much more flavor.

But if you are mixing, then go with the lower proof, cheaper stuff for sure.

Some people love bourbon, some don't. My dad thinks bourbon is just okay...he's a scotch guy. I don't like scotch at all. I do like Irish Whiskey. I had Redbreast 12 last night...super good and very smooth.

I kind of rambled there, but hope some of that is helpful.
 

noble cane

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Most people who find whiskey too harsh to drink neat or sip on the rocks are having a reaction to the presence of rye in the recipe. In many people, they have a small slight, perhaps severe, food allergy. If you had a gag reflex the first couple of drinks of Jack Daniel’s in high school, chances are good you are allergic to rye. With or without the allergy, the rye is almost surely the culprit when people reject a bourbon. It’s a cheap filler best fed to horses. You are definitely in this category because Makers was the first major bourbon to omit the rye. Purportedly because Mrs Samuels, who handled the marketing (she came up with the wax idea), made bread from each of the first couple of test batches. Everyone agreed that the mash still used today made the best tasting bread they went with that. It was the only test mash without the rye.

Note that Chris says he doesn’t like the ryes either. Chris or others can give you a list of wheat bourbons. Pappy being the most famous. Weller another. Most have the ingredients on the label. If you see rye, put it back. Try Buffalo Trace first. It does have some rye, but very little.

Which brings me to my second point on harshness. How and where it is aged makes all the difference in the world. The higher the temperature in the summer, the more apt it is to be harsh. The colder it gets the less flavor you get. The aging barrel is a living organism that expands and contracts under weather conditions and it’s the molecular exchange between the wood and liquor that gives bourbon its final taste and colo

So Maker’s uses Wood store houses that have been constructed abd tested over almost 100 years. The guys know how heat enters and lingers in the barn during the summer. They rotate the bourbon up and down the barn several times each summer to give the top barrels a rest and the bottom a kickstart.

The cheap stuff and modern commercial bourbons do not have access to the old barns and ship their stuff out of state for aging. The limestone aquifer in Franklin County and the exact right humidity in summer is what makes KY bourbon exceptional over other areas. You can’t truck it over the United States and age it in an aluminum warehouse, not rotate it, and expect the same results. The one exception might be the original red house where Blanton’s is aged. It is metal. But it is carefully monitored and each barrel is rotated by hand several times.

So you probably want to stick with single barrel and small batches. They have the most closely monitored aging.

And once you study who ages what and where and how, you’ll get a feel for the best tasting regardless of price. Evan Williams Bottled in Bond, when it was not being mass produced, was a good example. It tasted every bit as good as bourbons with shelf prices over $100.00 and I don’t think I’ve ever paid more than $15.00 for it. Again, because EW aged it in place in one of their oldest aging houses.

Great post. Disagree however on Rye. But, i like a good peated scotch too.
 

Gmoney4WW

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Most people who find whiskey too harsh to drink neat or sip on the rocks are having a reaction to the presence of rye in the recipe. In many people, they have a small slight, perhaps severe, food allergy. If you had a gag reflex the first couple of drinks of Jack Daniel’s in high school, chances are good you are allergic to rye. With or without the allergy, the rye is almost surely the culprit when people reject a bourbon. It’s a cheap filler best fed to horses. You are definitely in this category because Makers was the first major bourbon to omit the rye. Purportedly because Mrs Samuels, who handled the marketing (she came up with the wax idea), made bread from each of the first couple of test batches. Everyone agreed that the mash still used today made the best tasting bread they went with that. It was the only test mash without the rye.

Note that Chris says he doesn’t like the ryes either. Chris or others can give you a list of wheat bourbons. Pappy being the most famous. Weller another. Most have the ingredients on the label. If you see rye, put it back. Try Buffalo Trace first. It does have some rye, but very little.

Which brings me to my second point on harshness. How and where it is aged makes all the difference in the world. The higher the temperature in the summer, the more apt it is to be harsh. The colder it gets the less flavor you get. The aging barrel is a living organism that expands and contracts under weather conditions and it’s the molecular exchange between the wood and liquor that gives bourbon its final taste and colo

So Maker’s uses Wood store houses that have been constructed abd tested over almost 100 years. The guys know how heat enters and lingers in the barn during the summer. They rotate the bourbon up and down the barn several times each summer to give the top barrels a rest and the bottom a kickstart.

The cheap stuff and modern commercial bourbons do not have access to the old barns and ship their stuff out of state for aging. The limestone aquifer in Franklin County and the exact right humidity in summer is what makes KY bourbon exceptional over other areas. You can’t truck it over the United States and age it in an aluminum warehouse, not rotate it, and expect the same results. The one exception might be the original red house where Blanton’s is aged. It is metal. But it is carefully monitored and each barrel is rotated by hand several times.

So you probably want to stick with single barrel and small batches. They have the most closely monitored aging.

And once you study who ages what and where and how, you’ll get a feel for the best tasting regardless of price. Evan Williams Bottled in Bond, when it was not being mass produced, was a good example. It tasted every bit as good as bourbons with shelf prices over $100.00 and I don’t think I’ve ever paid more than $15.00 for it. Again, because EW aged it in place in one of their oldest aging houses.
I'm with you on the allergy thing.

A lot of people never get a full allergy panel. They don't realize that some of the things(food & drink) they never liked, were adverse reactions to the taste of it, and it was their body telling them you have a mild to severe allergy to that substance. My mom & a few other people I know got a full allergy panel late in life, and realized just that very thing.

Myself I've never liked black pepper, radishes, or okra. If I ever get an allergy panel, I would be very surprised if there was not mild allergies that included most of those food items. I also think that a similar taste can fool your body into not liking something because it has a similar taste to something you are allergic to. For instance alcohol, and in this instance bourbon that has a peppery taste is something I don't care for. Huffycane was going off of limited info, because that was all the info that Nevadanatural had. But that doesn't necessarily say Huffy was wrong in his guesses. I'd say that hypotheses has a better than average chance of being true for most people.
 
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HuffyCane

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I'm with you on the allergy thing.

A lot of people never get a full allergy panel. They don't realize that some of the things(food & drink) they never liked, were adverse reactions to the taste of it, and it was their body telling them you have a mild to severe allergy to that substance. My mom & a few other people I know got a full allergy panel late in life, and realized just that very thing.

Myself I've never liked black pepper, radishes, or okra. If I ever get an allergy panel, I would be very surprised if there was not mild allergies that included most of those food items. I also think that a similar taste can fool your body into not liking something because it has a similar taste to something you are allergic to. For instance alcohol, and in this instance bourbon that has a peppery taste is something I don't care for. Huffycane was going off of limited info, because that was all the info that Nevadanatural had. But that doesn't necessarily say Huffy was wrong in his guesses. I'd say that hypotheses has a better than average chance of being true for most people.
How in the hell did you survive in Oklahoma without eating black pepper or okra?
 

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